Seventhman Blog

Nov 27
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A Written Agreement Between Two Or More States

A compact for which much information is available online is the Multistate Tax Compact, which came into effect in 1967. Its members include 15 states and the District of Columbia. [76] The Committee on Multistate Taxes has decided that the Commission pursues the following objectives: the date of approval of Congress is not set by the Constitution, so that approval can be given either before or after the approval by the states of a particular pact. Consent may be explicit, but it can also be inferred from the circumstances. Congress may also set conditions for approving a pact. [2] Congress must explicitly approve any pact that would increase the political power of states in a way that would bring down the power of the federal government. [3] While intergovernmental pacts historically consisted only of states as parties, the federal government has recently participated in some pacts. [73] Indeed, some Pacts require a representative of the federal government to participate in compact governance. For example, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and the Compact Tunnel require that a member of the 13-member board of directors governing the pact be appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, as noted above.

[74] Some pacts have been implemented by Congress under federal law and provide for direct federal involvement in matters involved in the pact, such as the Interstate Agreement on Detainers,[75] which applies to the transfer of prisoners convicted of independent trials. The treaties between states that were ratified after American independence in 1776, until the ratification of the present U.S. Constitution in 1789, according to the articles of confederation, are treated as intergovernmental pacts. These include agreements such as the Beaufort Treaty, which established the georgia-South Carolina border in 1787 and is still in force. Intergovernmental pacts are different from the Uniform Acts, which are standard statutes established by non-governmental legal experts, which must be adopted independently by state legislators, rather than forming an agreement between several states. [35] Buenger et al., supra note 2, at 237. The purposes can be developed according to two target groups: legislators from states that wish to enter the Covenant before their approval, and then those who will act under the Covenant, as well as all judicial procedures that may be called upon to interpret or enforce it.

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